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Lizzo and Blueface flirting over Instagram, radio
The rapper gave her a shout-out during a radio appearance, which she responded to on Instagram.
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nypost.com
Group of Spring Breakers Test Positive for COVID-19 After Visiting Alabama Beach
The group began their trip in Nashville, Tennessee around March 13, before then moving onto Gulf Shores in Alabama three days later.
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newsweek.com
What you can do to help close the gender pay gap
More than 50 years after the passage of the landmark Equal Pay Act of 1963, women still lag behind their male counterparts in every profession in the US.
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edition.cnn.com
Commentary: Trump's daily briefings are short on facts. The nightly news stepped into the breach
At a moment in which viewers are eager for facts about the coronavirus outbreak, nightly news programs and other venerable formats are delivering.
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latimes.com
Kelly Ripa has quarantine-themed birthday message for husband Mark Consuelos
Kelly Ripa, who has never been shy about displaying her affection for Mark Consuelos, shares a birthday message for her husband on Instagram.        
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usatoday.com
Michigan AG's office to review sex assault investigation of Michigan State basketball player
The reported sexual assault took place Jan. 19, and the player was suspended by the team on Jan. 24.        
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usatoday.com
'My Pillow' Trends After MyPillow Founder Urges Americans to Focus on Religion During White House Coronavirus Briefing
"I encourage you to use this time at home to get back in the Word, read our bibles and spend time with our families," Lindell said Monday.
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newsweek.com
Disgraced WeWork cofounder Adam Neumann could unload nearly $1B in stock
“People are losing their jobs while Adam makes millions.”
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nypost.com
NCAA will let spring athletes come back for another year
The NCAA is giving spring athletes — and not just seniors —  another year of eligibility due to the coronavirus pandemic that cut their seasons well short, the organization announced Monday evening after a vote by the Division I council. But winter athletes, who were unable to complete their seasons, will not get the same...
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nypost.com
The Instacart strike, explained
Vanessa Bain is one of many Instacart shoppers going on strike for better working conditions during the coronavirus pandemic. | Nick Otto/Washington Post Why workers at Instacart, Whole Foods, and Amazon are walking off the job in protest. Workers for Instacart, one of the most popular US grocery delivery apps, went on strike Monday, demanding better pay and health protections as they risk exposing themselves to the coronavirus to deliver essentials to people on lockdown. Instacart and other grocery delivery workers are facing soaring demand — as much as 65 percent more compared to the same time last year across the top three services in the first week of March alone. But many of them say they feel increasingly unsafe doing their jobs because the companies they work for are not providing basic support, like giving them the time and supplies to wash their hands between shifts. Instacart shoppers’ complaints echo those of other workers: Around 50 Amazon workers at a warehouse in Staten Island, New York, reportedly walked off the job on Monday in protest of the company’s decision to keep the facility open despite one of their colleagues being diagnosed with Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. And Whole Foods workers are planning a national “sickout” on Tuesday to call for better protections, such as free coronavirus testing for employees and paid leave for staffers under quarantine. “We are lacking things that are essential for our safety and the safety of our customers. We are potentially going to be vectors of this disease,” said Vanessa Bain, an Instacart shopper and leader of the group organizing the strike, Gig Workers Collective. Though we don’t have an exact number of strikers, and Instacart says the protest hasn’t reduced customer orders, these actions are effective in a different way: They’re drawing the attention of the public, and politicians, to the health risks that workers are taking to keep US supply chains running during a public health crisis. These workers had been pushing for better pay and basic benefits like health care long before the coronavirus pandemic, but now there’s a renewed sense of urgency around workers’ demands when their lives, and the lives of their customers, could depend on it. “I believe this is really a time for these companies to show leadership and show that they get it,” said Rep. Ro Khanna (D-CA), who represents a wide swath of Silicon Valley. “I think doing something dramatic like doubling wages for folks, for a few months, I think would be a great gesture.” Instacart has changed some of its policies in response to workers’ demands in the several weeks leading up to the strike. It began offering new worker benefits, such as providing 14 days of paid time off for shoppers who can prove they have been diagnosed with the coronavirus or placed under mandatory quarantine, as well as a new bonus based on shoppers’ performance. The company also announced plans on Friday to acquire and distribute hand sanitizer. Instacart told Recode that overall, its workforce has seen earnings increase by 40 percent in the past month compared to the month prior. When asked about the strike and workers’ concerns, a spokesperson for Instacart told Recode in a statement: In the last four weeks, Instacart has introduced morethan 15 new product features, new health guidelines, new shopper bonuses, new sick leave policies, and new safety supplies, as well as pay for those affected by COVID-19. Our team has an unwavering commitment to safely serve our shoppers in the wake of COVID-19, and we’ll continue to share additional updates over the coming days, weeks and months ahead as we further support this important community. The company also said that it respects the rights of shoppers to provide feedback and voice concerns. Why exactly are workers striking? Instacart strikers want the company to take immediate action to reduce their risk of coronavirus exposure. Shoppers — whose work requires them to interact with grocery store clerks, customers, and other shoppers — are concerned about catching and spreading Covid-19. Workers are also concerned about touching surfaces such as plastic bags and food items that could be contaminated with the virus and then passing it on to customers. (Though it may be possible to contract the disease via contaminated surfaces, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the primary mode of spread is through person-to-person contact.) Workers say that if Instacart provided access to better hand-washing facilities between deliveries, gloves, and other preventive sanitation measures, that could help mitigate the risk. In order to mitigate these risks, they’re asking four things of Instacart: First, they want personal protective supplies at no cost to workers, such as hand sanitizer (which the company has started to distribute), disinfectant solutions and wipes, and soap. Second, they want hazard pay of an extra $5 per order; third, they want the default tip in the app to be set to at least 10 percent of customers’ total orders. And fourth, they’re pressing the company to grant 14 days of sick time to anyone who has been impacted by Covid-19 and provides a doctor’s note saying as much, or if they have a preexisting condition or are at high risk for facing complications from Covid-19. “I guarantee you, if you tell a customer, there’s a chance there’s a shopper who is handling your product and packaging your groceries has coronavirus, they would say, ‘no thank you.’” said Bain. What impact is the strike having? Since organizers aren’t counting how many people are participating in the strike, all we have are numbers from Instacart itself. And in a reflection of how many Americans are turning to the service during the pandemic, the company says business is doing just fine — even better than before — during this strike. “As it relates to today’s actions, we’ve seen absolutely no impact to Instacart’s operations,” a spokesperson for Instacart wrote in a statement. The company said that on Monday, it saw 40 percent more shoppers on the platform compared to the same day and time last week, and that over the past 72 hours, it sold more groceries than ever before. It also said that in the past week alone, 250,000 new people signed up to become Instacart full-service shoppers, and 50,000 of them have already started shopping on the platform. Regardless, the strike is raising awareness about worker issues in the gig economy. And Instacart’s new leave policy, which it enacted on March 10, is at least a start in addressing some of workers’ concerns. “We have to recognize the courage of these workers at Instacart and Amazon, who risk their own safety doing essential work that’s allowing us to have food for our family and our kids, and to have basic supplies,” Khanna told Recode. “While many of us are sheltering in place and working remotely, these workers are doing the essential services to keep our society functioning. So the least we can do is make sure they have safe conditions.” Khanna said he supports the strikers at Instacart in demanding more from their employers, and that he also sees a role for the government to help essential workers in the grocery and shipping industries. He said he is in discussions about proposing what he’s calling a “GI Bill” for essential workers during the coronavirus pandemic, such as emergency and health care workers, as well as people like Instacart shoppers and Amazon warehouse workers. The bill would have the government distribute special bonuses to these workers, among other benefits. Labor activists and other labor-friendly politicians such as Khanna have also called on gig economy companies such as Instacart, Uber, and Lyft to follow new legislation in California, AB 5, that was intended to compel companies to convert their contracted workforce to employees, entitling them to benefits such as health care and paid time off. Most companies have been largely ignoring the legislation, arguing that the new rules don’t apply to their workers. What will happen next Organizers of the Instacart strike have said that they will continue to strike until their demands are met in full. In the meantime, their action, especially in light of concurrent protests from workers at Amazon and other companies, is emphasizing more starkly than ever how the gig economy puts its workers in a precarious place, even as more people rely on their services. “I think that consumers are seeing how reliant they are on these particular workers and how essential in this pandemic their work is, so it’s a particularly powerful moment,” said Veena Dubal,alaw professor at UC Hastings, who researches the gig economy. Instacart has positioned its workers as a community of “household heroes” — providing a critical service to Americans during a global crisis. It remains to be seen, though, if these workers can successfully negotiate for the better working conditions they’ve long been asking for — and not just during these unprecedentedly difficult times.
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vox.com
Florida coronavirus order could further delay MLB 2020 season
Major League Baseball is closely monitoring the coronavirus situation in Florida, where Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Monday he’s going to sign a “safer-at-home” executive order for four counties in southeast Florida. The order, if it goes into effect, would last through mid-May and would make it unlikely any form of spring training could occur in...
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nypost.com
Matthew McConaughey urges fans to stay inside: 'We are at war with a virus'
Matthew McConaughey has a strong message for his followers.
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foxnews.com
ACLU Sues D.C. Department of Corrections Over Coronavirus Outbreak in Jail
The ACLU sued the D.C. Department of Corrections Monday for alleged "flagrant disregard of basic public health measures to limit the spread and severity of a COVID-19 outbreak inside the D.C. Jail."
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newsweek.com
Jessie James Decker addresses post-baby body insecurities: 'I know a lot of moms feel the same way'
Jessie James Decker is opening up about her insecurities.
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foxnews.com
Behind Trump’s Reversal on Reopening the Country: 2 Sets of Numbers
An estimate of the number of possible deaths and polling that showed a cautious public changed, for now, the president’s approach to the coronavirus pandemic.
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nytimes.com
In California: The 3D industry, retirees and students respond to the pandemic
Retirees and students can now join the ranks of those fighting coronavirus, part of an initiative unveiled Monday by Gov. Gavin Newsom. And I talk with Dave Gaylord of MatterHackers on the company's efforts to connect health professionals in need of equipment with those in the 3D printing industry.       
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usatoday.com
Nets, Barclays Center workers getting full pay in big coronavirus effort
Every bit of help is key amidst this coronavirus pandemic, whether it’s food, cash or medical supplies. The Nets, Barclays Center and Alibaba — all owned by Joe Tsai — have been providing all of the above. With live sports shut down and teams and arenas getting squeezed economically, many hourly workers have been laid...
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nypost.com
Restaurants transition to take-out only service during coronavirus
Restaurants around the country are fighting to stay open during the COVID-19 pandemic.       
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usatoday.com
Matthew Slater says New England Patriots can forge a new identity without Tom Brady
Matthew Slater, now the longest-tenured Patriots player, says New England will "have to find a new identity" without Tom Brady.       
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usatoday.com
Can Kawhi Leonard pick up his historic Clippers season where he left off?
Kawhi Leonard was having one of the best statistical seasons in Clippers history, a feat done only 15 times by five players, before the season stopped.
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latimes.com
NYPD commissioner on losing five members to coronavirus: 'We don't really even have time to mourn'
New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea joined "The Story" Monday to discuss the coronavirus pandemic's impact on the force after a uniformed officer and four civilian members succumbed to the virus.
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foxnews.com
American Media Inc. slashes staff ranks, pay during corona downturn
The publisher behind Us Weekly, the National Enquirer, In Touch, OK! and Radar Online isn't looking healthy.
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nypost.com
National Guardsman Is First Service Member To Die After Testing Positive For COVID-19
The Department of Defense said the New Jersey Army National Guardsman had been hospitalized since March 21 and died on Saturday.
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npr.org
'Bachelor' spinoff 'Summer Games' shelved due to coronavirus outbreak
"The Bachelor Summer Games," the latest installment of the famed ABC "Bachelor" franchise, has been shelved.
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foxnews.com
Pastor arrested for holding services despite stay-at-home order
A pastor of a Tampa church has been arrested for holding large services despite a "safer-at-home" order in Hillsborough county.
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edition.cnn.com
Trump expected to ease Obama-era vehicle mileage standards
The Trump administration is expected this week to ease Obama-era regulations on fuel emission standards, capping off more than two years of legal battles between the president and states that opposed the move.
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foxnews.com
Center Theatre Group suspends all shows until fall, furloughs half its staff
L.A.'s largest nonprofit theater company suspends the rest of the season, including its LeBron James play "King James." It projects a massive deficit.
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latimes.com
UK police bust party attended by dozens of people, complete with karaoke machine
Police in the United Kingdom said officers "were in absolute shock" when they found 25 adults and children flouting a lockdown order by having a party "with speakers and karaoke" amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus invades SoFi Stadium construction as a dangerous dilemma is building
SoFi Stadium is scheduled to open in July, however, an unidentified construction worker has tested positive for coronavirus, which could delay the opening of the Rams' and Chargers' new home.
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latimes.com
Free tacos at Taco Bell drive-thrus as part of its coronavirus response
Taco Bell is giving away free Nacho Cheese Doritos Locos Tacos March 31 in the drive-thru of participating locations amid COVID-19 crisis.      
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usatoday.com
Fauci anticipates another US coronavirus outbreak in the fall
The nation’s top infectious disease expert said Monday that he anticipates the US will endure another coronavirus outbreak in the fall — but by then he said, the country will be better equipped to fight the illness. Dr. Anthony Fauci, a member of the White House coronavirus task force, shared the outlook at a Rose...
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nypost.com
If you want to feel better about this pandemic, consider the Black Plague
No one would make light of a pandemic that has already cost so much in terms of death, suffering and treasure — especially since there is undoubtedly so much more to come. But still, it must be said that if we are to have a pandemic, the early 21st century is the best time in...
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nypost.com
Meghan Markle, Prince Harry 'personally' covering security costs, report says
Following Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's announcement that they'd "step back" as senior members of the royal family, questions have swirled as to who would front the cost of their security.
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foxnews.com
Mainstream media mocks White House appearance of 'My Pillow Guy' Mike Lindell despite contribution to virus fight
Several members of the media were quick to dismiss the presence of "My Pillow" founder Mike Lindell at the White House coronavirus press briefing despite his company's ongoing contribution to combating the outbreak. 
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foxnews.com
Fact check: Trump again touts unproven drugs for coronavirus, and other misleading statements from Monday's briefing
President Donald Trump made another series of inaccurate and misleading statements during his coronavirus press briefing Monday afternoon from the White House Rose Garden.
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edition.cnn.com
Four Boston Hospitals Report Significant Numbers Of Employees Have The Coronavirus
The hospitals, including Massachusetts General Hospital, Beth Israel Deaconess, Brigham and Women's, and Tufts, say that 345 employees have tested positive for COVID-19.
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npr.org
Yes, a 'Tiger King' personality shared the stage with Britney Spears at the 2001 VMAs
What do Doc Antle of "Tiger King" and Britney Spears have in common? They both rocked the stage at the 2001 MTV Video Music Awards.       
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usatoday.com
Trump says he could see recommending all Americans wear masks
President Donald Trump said Monday he could foresee a scenario where all Americans are recommended to wear masks in public to prevent the spread of coronavirus.
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edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus questions answered: Can you be reinfected with the virus after you recover?
Dr. Marty Makary, Fox News medical contributor and professor of public health at Johns Hopkins University, appeared on "Special Report with Bret Baier" where he answered questions regarding the continuing coronavirus outbreak.
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foxnews.com
Aaron Carter’s girlfriend Melanie Martin arrested for alleged domestic violence
Aaron Carter’s girlfriend, Melanie Martin, was arrested on Sunday night in Los Angeles after police investigated an alleged altercation between the pair at Carter’s home, Fox News has confirmed.
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foxnews.com
Parts of US Open stadium complex in Queens to be turned into hospital amid coronavirus
Part of the Queens stadium complex that’s home to the U.S. Open will be transformed into a temporary hospital to aid in the fight against the coronavirus. An indoor training area at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center is expected to be turned into a 350-bed medical facility beginning on Tuesday, USTA spokesman...
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nypost.com
Tenants get more help, as L.A. freezes rent for thousands of apartments amid coronavirus
L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti announces that rent increases on rent controlled apartments will be banned during the coronavirus pandemic.
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latimes.com
Myron Rolle, former NFL safety, on front lines of coronavirus fight as Boston neurosurgery resident
Myron Rolle is a modern Renaissance Man. He’s a Rhodes Scholar, a former Tennessee Titans safety who went to Florida State before being drafted in the sixth round of the 2010 NFL draft, and these days he’s on the coronavirus frontlines as a third-year neurosurgery resident in Boston at Massachusetts General Hospital.
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foxnews.com
Chris Smith's decision to go to NBA or return to UCLA shrouded in uncertainty
UCLA guard Chris Smith's decision whether to turn pro is uncertain.
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latimes.com
The Fight to Suspend Rent Payments in Seattle
In December, council member Kshama Sawant introduced a winter ban on evictions in Seattle and won. Then the coronavirus happened.
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slate.com
Lizzo buys lunch for ER staff at multiple hospitals
One of the hospitals was in Minneapolis, where the singer began her career.
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nypost.com
Coronavirus: Airbnb CEO offers apology, $250 million to hosts hurt by refund policy
On Monday Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky promised financial help, including $250 million for hosts hurt by its cancellation policy.      
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usatoday.com
Army Corps of Engineers commander says more New York-style pop-up hospitals coming soon
Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite, the commanding general of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, told Fox News' "The Story" Monday that residents of Chicago and other parts of the country can expect to see pop-up field hospitals like those appearing in New York City to help fight the coronavirus contagion.
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foxnews.com