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Kid reunites with father who was in quarantine for 3 weeks
A young boy could be seen running to his father’s arms, after having not seen him for three weeks while he was self-quarantined to fight the coronavirus, online video shows.
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foxnews.com
Chicago restaurant trolls Bears’ Mitch Trubisky in social-distancing plea
Mitch Trubisky may never bring the Bears to a Super Bowl, but at least he can help lead Chicago to safety. A Chicago restaurant called Chip Monks is humorously highlighting the struggles of the maligned former No. 2 overall pick as a method for measuring the appropriate amount of social distancing with a sign inside...
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nypost.com
Pfizer working on promising coronavirus treatment, vaccine
Drugmaker Pfizer said Thursday that it is working on a promising treatment for coronavirus, as well as vaccine. The drugmaker said preclinical studies showed that an unspecified compound that was originally used to treat SARS — a different coronavirus — has shown potential in battling the dangerous illness. Pfizer research chief Mikael Dolsten said the...
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nypost.com
Joaquin Phoenix opens up about checking himself into rehab
Joaquin Phoenix is getting candid about a difficult time in his life. 
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foxnews.com
Disney shares recipe for Dole Whip as an at-home treat
Dole Whips – the fan-favorite Disney park staple that those of us outside of Adventureland only dream about, until now.
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foxnews.com
International Monetary Fund Head Predicts Coronavirus Will Trigger ‘Worst Economic Fallout Since the Great Depression’
IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva anticipates the world's poorest countries will suffer the most
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time.com
Inmates spitting in guards’ faces amid coronavirus outbreak in NYC jails, sources say
Spiteful inmates are coughing and spitting on correction officers as the pandemic COVID-19 has become potentially weaponized in city jails, The Post has learned. “I got the virus, I don’t give a f–k. I got ‘rona, suck my d–k,” one inmate snarled before spewing on the guards, one source recalled. More than 400 corrections officers...
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nypost.com
8 Capitol Police employees test positive for cornonavirus
The novel coronavirus has hit Congress' law enforcement agency, with eight United States Capitol Police (USCP) personnel testing positive, the department said Thursday.
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foxnews.com
With Sanders out, can Biden consolidate the left?
Joe Biden's mission: Win over Sanders and his progressive supporters and unite the Democratic Party without steering too far to the left.
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foxnews.com
Billionaire Cliff Asness’ hedge fund AQR hit with $43B COVID-19 losses
Billionaire investor Cliff Asness has spent his quarantine watching $43 billion disappear. Asness’ AQR Capital — which managed $186 billion at the end of 2019 — has updated its Web site to reflect that its assets under management as of March 31 now stand at $143 billion. It’s unclear how much of the massive 23...
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nypost.com
Coronavirus traces found in Massachusetts wastewater at levels far higher than expected
Coronavirus was detected in Massachusetts sewage at higher levels than expected, suggesting there are many more undiagnosed patients than previously known, according to a new study. Researchers from biotech startup Biobot Analytics collected samples from a wastewater facility for an unnamed metropolitan area in late March, according to a report Tuesday on medRxiv. Eric Alm,...
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nypost.com
Hulu to 'Parasite' haters: 'If you don't want to read subtitles,' learn Korean
Hulu had some choice words for Twitter trolls who tried to dismiss "Parasite," the Oscar-winning South Korean film, upon its digital release this week.
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latimes.com
Damon Dash's former Beverly Hills villa seeks $5 million
In the Beverly Hills Post Office area, a Mediterranean-style villa once owned by entrepreneur Damon Dash is asking $4.995 million.
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latimes.com
Michigan extends stay-at-home order through April
Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has extended Michigan's stay-at-home order through April (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
China Holds Navy Drills in Pacific As U.S. Aircraft Carriers Hit by Coronavirus
China's catamaran-style Type 22 fast attack craft is designed to overwhelm much larger targets, such as U.S. aircraft carriers used to challenge Chinese claims to the Pacific.
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newsweek.com
College admissions scandal prosecutors argue cases against Lori Loughlin and others shouldn't be dismissed
Federal prosecutors in the college admissions scandal tell a judge in court documents that their late disclosure of some notes to defense attorneys was due to an error, but that should not result in a dismissal of the charges against actress Lori Loughlin, her husband and 12 others.
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edition.cnn.com
WATCH LIVE: White House Takes New Precautions Ahead Of Coronavirus Briefing
The White House gave all reporters attending the briefing a coronavirus test on Thursday as a precaution after a member of the press corps awaited test results. Watch the briefing live shortly.
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npr.org
Stephen Curry surprises Oakland ICU nurse on FaceTime, praises her for grit and inspiration
Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry thanks ICU nurse Shelby Delaney of the Summit Medical Center for her selflessness.        
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usatoday.com
ER nurse: We're facing an 'invisible' monster
The COVID-19 pandemic has raised the stakes for nurses trying to relieve suffering and save lives while trying to stay safe themselves. (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
Louisiana Coronavirus Update: State Reports 18,000 Cases and 700 Deaths, Cruise Ship Docks in New Orleans
The state has become one of the country's hot spots during the outbreak.
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newsweek.com
Happy birthdays while social distancing
Stay-at-home orders and social distancing has changed the way many people celebrate birthdays.       
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usatoday.com
Key material behind the shortage of N95 masks
A surge in demand for the material that forms the key filter layer in medical respirators has caused long waits on new orders.
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cbsnews.com
'Saturday Night Live' to deliver brand new, socially distant episode this weekend
Coronavirus lockdown be damned: "Saturday Night Live" will be just that — live — this weekend. It just won't be what audiences are used to.
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latimes.com
He’s delivering your groceries to you. He’s also risking his life.
A trip to the supermarket with a new kind of essential worker.
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washingtonpost.com
2020 Time Capsule #13: The Struggle is Over
This week Donald Trump announced the departure of a press secretary who differed from all predecessors in a basic way: She didn’t do the job.In more than eight months in office, this press secretary, Stephanie Grisham, appeared frequently on Fox programs but never once held a White House briefing for reporters. Three of her predecessors in the Trump era—Sean Spicer, Anthony Scaramucci, and Sarah Huckabee Sanders—appeared often enough in the White House press room for their briefing styles to become the basis for Saturday Night Live cold-open routines. (This was before Sanders suspended briefings in her final months on the job.) Grisham’s briefings couldn’t be mimicked, because they didn’t occur.Her successor will also be someone who differs from anyone who has held the job before. The new secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, will be the first press secretary to begin the job with a bone-dry reservoir of trust and good will from the press.Through the modern history of this job—which probably begins with Steve Early, spokesman for Franklin Delano Roosevelt through most of his long years in office—press secretaries have been in an impossible situation. They need to be discreet enough about an Administration’s internal dealings that the president will still trust them. But they also need to be open enough that reporters will still think the press secretary is trying to get them closer to, rather than farther away from, the truth. They need to speak “the truth,” to maintain trust and respect from the press. But not “the full truth”—not every single detail they know—to maintain trust from the president and other officials.Finding the “right” position is a day-by-day struggle. If a president can’t trust a press secretary to keep some things quiet, then the secretary will be left in the dark, away from the White House inner circle. Then if the reporters realize that a press secretary is an outsider, his or her influence practically vanishes. But if reporters find out later on that a secretary was withholding information that could have been shared—or, worse, sending false signals—then the damage to the press secretary is even worse.In the days before Trump, awareness of this struggle is what distinguished the best press secretaries. Some of them come straight from jobs on “the other side” of the press/politics divide. For instance, Jay Carney went from Time magazine to become an Obama press secretary, or Ron Nessen was an NBC News correspondent and then worked for Gerald Ford. Some are long-time aides and confidantes of a president. Jody Powell, a young campaign staffer, represented Jimmy Carter as press secretary, and Bill Moyers played a similar role with Lyndon Johnson. Some are “public affairs professionals,” who have done this job in other circumstances. For instance: Dana Perino, who became press secretary at the end of George W. Bush’s time in office, or Marlin Fitzwater, who worked for Ronald Reagan and the first George Bush.They came from different backgrounds, but all these previous press secretaries tried to strike the balance between giving out too much information, and not enough.Under Donald Trump, only one press secretary seemed even to recognize this challenge. From day one, the unfortunate Sean Spicer was stuck trying to defend “largest Inaugural crowd in history!” claims. Spicer’s awareness of his preposterous position was the most appealing thing about his brief time on the briefing-room podium.With Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the struggle abated, since her remarks were aimed at a one-person audience, Trump himself. Stephanie Grisham avoided the tension by not dealing with the press at all, and confining herself to Fox. Kayleigh McEnany is one more step down this road, since her background as a public figure was as a cable-tv “panelist” during the 2016 campaign, where her role was not to express a “conservative” or even GOP-loyalist perspective but instead to defend whatever it was that Donald Trump had done or said.As Caleb Ecarma pointed out this week in Vanity Fair: McEnany, like her press-bashing boss, [has taken every] opportunity to attack the news media. “The media’s best hope is for Donald Trump to suspend his rallies,” she said. “They have been wanting him to stop this, they know it’s his avenue to speak directly to the American people. So we’re going to follow the president’s lead, we’re not going to cave to the media and Joe Biden.” There appears to be nowhere McEnany isn’t willing to follow Trump, even dating back to his conspiracies about Barack Obama’s place of birth. In 2012, when Trump was accusing America’s first black president of being born in Kenya and was thus ineligible to serve, McEnany chimed in support of the unfounded theory, tweeting, “How I Met Your Brother—Never mind, forgot he’s still in that hut in Kenya. #ObamaTVShows.” In a 2016 CNN segment archived by Media Matters, McEnany stepped out to defend the then-candidate’s infamous “Grab ’em by the pussy” hot-mic moment, shrugging off the remark as “implie[d] consent.” [JF note: I wrote about the “grab ’em” episode at the time, here.] Every press secretary has ups and downs in his or her relationship with the media. They add to their store of trust in certain moments; they run it down at others. The struggle between duties to the president and to the public, between saying too much and saying too little, defined the job.Now the struggle is over. No previous press secretary has started the job with no cushion of credibility whatsoever. That’s where this one begins.For the record, here are several events of the past few days, any one of which would have been week-defining news in previous eras:Donald Trump personally fired two inspectors-general. One was Michael Atkinson, whom Trump made clear he was punishing for calling attention to his Ukraine call. The other was Glenn Fine, set to oversee disbursement of coronavirus relief funds.Inspectors general have been part of the federal landscape for many decades. For a president to fire one, let alone two, is rare enough that at the moment I can’t recall any other examples. As Benjamin Wittes asked on the Lawfare site, “Why Is Trump’s Inspector General Purge Not a National Scandal?” Thomas Modly, the acting secretary of the Navy who dismissed Captain Brett Crozier, of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, offered a resignation-under-pressure, after he gratuitously attacked Crozier as “too naive or too stupid” during a speech in front of members of Roosevelt Crozier’s crew. Along with hundreds of his crew members, Crozier himself has tested positive for the virus. Donald Trump’s marathon daily “briefings” on the virus situation, which I argued ten days ago were becoming substitutes for campaign rallies, have become so unhinged that even his loyalists on the Wall Street Journal editorial page today called for their cessation, because they were hurting Trump. For instance: On Tuesday Mr. Trump was asked, in a typically tendentious question, why he had compared the coronavirus to the flu. Instead of saying he had been hoping for the best but was wrong when he'd said that, he got into a fight over the severity of the flu. This sort of exchange usually devolves into a useless squabble that helps Mr. Trump’s critics and contributes little to public understanding.The President’s outbursts against his political critics are also notably off key at this moment. This isn’t impeachment, and Covid-19 isn’t shifty Schiff. It’s a once-a-century threat to American life and livelihood. From the stalwarts on the WSJ editorial page, this is almost as notable as a brushback from Fox & Friends. As I write, the total of confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States is approaching half a million, and the death toll is approaching 15,000. As of three weeks ago, the greatest-ever number of new weekly claims for unemployment was around 250,000. Two weeks ago, more than 3 million Americans filed. One week ago, another 6 million-plus did. Today, yet another 6 million. Nothing like this has ever happened before.
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theatlantic.com
'Chrisley Knows Best' star Todd Chrisley hospitalized for days after COVID-19 diagnosis
"Chrisley Knows Best" star Todd Chrisley said his battle with coronavirus made him "the sickest I have ever been."        
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usatoday.com
Ava DuVernay, Viola Davis, Lee Daniels, more salute stylist who died of coronavirus
Ava DuVernay, Tyler Perry, Viola Davis, Lee Daniels and many more industry luminaries today paid tribute to Charles Gregory Ross after the Emmy-nominated hairstylist lost his battle with the coronavirus yesterday. “God bless you and keep you in His Kingdom forever,” DuVernay said of Ross, who she most recently worked with on her HBO Max...
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nypost.com
Emily Ratajkowski spotted at JFK airport in New York City amid coronavirus pandemic
Emily Ratajkowski is risking it all to get out from the confines of her New York City apartment amid a strong push by health care professionals and local and national government officials to keep folks at home while minimizing the spread of the novel coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
Florida woman arrested for leaving Easter eggs with food, toilet paper and porn in mailboxes: report
This probably wasn’t the care package most people were hoping for.
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foxnews.com
Sanders staffers can keep campaign health insurance through November
Staffers for Bernie Sanders’ now-suspended presidential campaign are thanking the Vermont senator for extending their health insurance coverage through late November despite not having a job anymore.
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foxnews.com
News of death should not come by phone. Doctors struggle to adapt to coronavirus reality
In New York City's overwhelmed emergency rooms, doctors are using FaceTime to tell loved ones that family members have died of COVID-19.
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latimes.com
Dr. Gupta: Here's why US has so many coronavirus deaths
CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains why the US has so many coronavirus deaths when compared with the rest of the world.
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edition.cnn.com
Teladoc soars on bet that virtual health is here to stay
Hospitals are swamped with coronavirus cases. And Americans are being encouraged to stay home unless absolutely necessary. That's why virtual health care services like Teladoc are thriving.
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edition.cnn.com
Remote Learning and the Vast Gulf Between Affluent Families and Everyone Else
Who should be worried about their kids falling behind?
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slate.com
New York rebooting unemployment website to fix case backlog amid coronavirus
New York state officials are revamping and rebooting the website for unemployment-insurance applications on Thursday in their latest bid to handle the flood of coronavirus-related benefit applications that have overwhelmed the system. The Department of Labor will shut down its online application portal at 5 p.m. and plans to reopen it with a new, “streamlined”...
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nypost.com
Storytime with Dana: 'Sheep Dog and Sheep Sheep'
In honor of my dog Jasper’s eighth birthday, I thought I would read a book about a great yet surprising friendship.
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foxnews.com
Nearing Anniversary Of Devastating Fire, Notre Dame To Host A Good Friday Service
April 15 will mark the first anniversary of the fire that ripped through the cathedral. The Paris archbishop says he wants to send a "message of hope" through a small Good Friday service.
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npr.org
Advocates: Inmates Released Early Due To Pandemic Need Help To Safely Shelter
In California, former inmates released early to help reduce coronavirus risks behind bars lack support when they get out, say advocates, who want better, organized help to address the crisis.
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npr.org
Pink chokes up talking about 3-year-old son's coronavirus
Pop star Pink said she and her 3-year-old son are recovering from the coronavirus. The singer told Ellen DeGeneres it was "the scariest thing I've ever, ever been through in my life."
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edition.cnn.com
Opinion | What Does Trump See in His ‘Invisible Enemy’?
By branding coronavirus as a hidden menace, he deftly absolves himself of responsibility for its spread.
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politico.com
Trump aide denied campaign rigging in pre-election conversation with FBI secret source: transcript
An FBI confidential human source secretly recorded George Papadopoulos in the final days of the 2016 presidential election and pressed him over whether the Trump campaign was involved in Russian election meddling -- something the campaign aide emphatically denied, according to a transcript of that conversation. 
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foxnews.com
CNN 10 - April 10, 2020
April 10, 2020
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edition.cnn.com
Small businesses helping fill protective gear void
The coronavirus pandemic has overwhelmed major manufacturers that specialize in personal protective equipment like face masks and face shields — so some smaller and medium sized businesses are switching course to make PPE. (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
Bodies buried in NYC trench increase amid pandemic
(WARNING: DISTURBING CONTENT) Drone video shows workers burying bodies in a NYC island trench amid the coronavirus pandemic. Burials at the city cemetery on Hart Island have increased from 25 a week to about 24 a day. (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
Gov. Andrew Cuomo Says New York's Hospitalization Rate, ICU Admissions Down: 'We Are Flattening the Curve'
The hospitalization rate and number of ICU admissions due to the coronavirus are coming down in New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced on Thursday, delivering the dose of positive news and adding that the state is "flattening the curve."
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breitbart.com
Stimulus check: How much money will you get, and when?
$2 trillion stimulus bill includes payments for most Americans. Here's how to figure out how much you'll receive.
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cbsnews.com
Review: Wize, a new online platform, needs tutors for dozens of subjects
At Wize, tutors set their own rates and keep every dollar.
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latimes.com
What Went Wrong in the Wisconsin Election, and What We Can Learn From It Before November
As voters in masks and gloves waited in line for hours to cast ballots on Tuesday, the speaker of the Wisconsin Assembly insisted everything was fine. The election, Robin Vos said, was “incredibly safe.” But his message was at odds with his outfit: he was clad head-to-toe in protective gear. The Wisconsin voting debacle unfolded…
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time.com