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Boing Boing
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Boing Boing
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Enjoy 30GB of 1980s noise music and post punk cassettes
Here's an amazingly huge collection of "tape experimentation, industrial, avant-garde, indy, rock, diy, subvertainment and auto-hypnotic materials" posted to archive.org. Completists who want this on a hard drive or USB stick can download the entire collection in a tar file here. This collection is a compilation of underground/independently-released cassette tapes from the days when the audio cassette was the standard method of music sharing... generally the mid-eighties through early-nineties. The material represented includes tape experimentation, industrial, avant-garde, indy, rock, diy, subvertainment and auto-hypnotic materials. Much of this material defies category, and has therefore not been given one. The bulk of the tapes in this library were donated to the project by former CKLN FM radio host Myke Dyer in August of 2009. The original NOISE-ARCH site was hosted and maintained by Graham Stewart and Mark Lougheed. [via Obscure Media] Read the rest
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NRA kicks out second in command, Christopher W. Cox accused of complicity in failed coup against Wayne LaPierre
Despite all they've achieved for Trump and Putin, it really does seem like The End is beginning for the National Russian Association. Couldn't happen to a better global crime money laundering operation. The NRA's woes got woe-er today, as group accused its second-in-command and top lobbyist Christopher W. Cox of complicity in the recent failed coup against chief executive Wayne LaPierre. From the New York Times: The accusation came in a lawsuit filed Wednesday night in New York State Supreme Court against Oliver North, the N.R.A.’s former president, who led the attempt to oust Mr. LaPierre shortly before the group’s annual convention in April. The complaint provides fresh detail about the effort against Mr. LaPierre, but it is the involvement of the organization’s No. 2 official, Christopher, W. Cox, that will reverberate. In the suit, the N.R.A. said that text messages and emails demonstrated that “another errant N.R.A. fiduciary, Chris Cox — once thought by some to be a likely successor for Mr. LaPierre — participated” in what was described as a conspiracy. The court filing includes text exchanges in which Mr. Cox and a board member appear to be discussing an effort to oust Mr. LaPierre, though the full context is unclear. The N.R.A. is conducting an internal review of the matter, and a spokesman, Andrew Arulanandam, said on Thursday that Mr. Cox had “been placed on administrative leave.” Responding to the accusations against him, Cox said in a statement today: The allegations against me are offensive and patently false. Read the rest
1 h
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An up close look at the tiny mites that mate on your face while you sleep
Dozens of demodex mites live inside the pores of your face skin. The little arachnids are fairly harmless,  feasting on sebum by day, and crawling across your face to find other demodex mites to mate with. [via The Kid Should See This] Read the rest
2 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Ta-Nehisi Coates makes the case for reparations to Congress
It's been five years since Ta-Nehisi Coates's groundbreaking The Case for Reparations ran in The Atlantic; yesterday, Coates appeared before Congress to celebrate Juneteenth with a barn-burning statement that starts as a response to Mitch McConnell's dismissal of racial injustice in America, but quickly becomes more than that -- a Coatesian masterclass in understanding race, America, history and the present moment. Yesterday, when asked about reparations, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell offered a familiar reply: America should not be held liable for something that happened 150 years ago, since none of us currently alive are responsible. This rebuttal proffers a strange theory of governance, that American accounts are somehow bound by the lifetime of its generations. But well into this century, the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of Civil War soldiers. We honor treaties that date back some 200 years, despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens, and thus bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach. It would seem ridiculous to dispute invocations of the Founders, or the Greatest Generation, on the basis of a lack of membership in either group. We recognize our lineage as a generational trust, as inheritance, and the real dilemma posed by reparations is just that: a dilemma of inheritance. It is impossible to imagine America without the inheritance of slavery. Read the rest
3 h
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Wonderful profile of Anita Sarkeesian, the feminist games critic who made an army of shitty manbabies very, very upset
Anita Sarkeesian (previously) is a brilliant media theorist and critic whose Feminist Frequency/Tropes vs. Women in Video Games projects revolutionized the way we talk about gender and games -- and also made her a target for a virulent misogynist hate-machine of harassing manbabies who threatened her life, doxed her, and did everything they could to intimidate her into silence. Polygon's 9,000 word profile of Sarkeesian contains a lot of color about her personality and approach (which is great stuff -- Sarkeesian is a fun and interesting person in real life as well as on-screen), but where it gets really good is in describing how Sarkeesian led a massive change in the way that games companies approach games, with "great women characters" appearing in "The Last of Us, Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, Dragon Age: Inquisition,The Walking Dead, Battlefield 5, Dishonored 2, Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice, Horizon Zero Dawn, and Overwatch" Sarkeesian's academic training is a combination of feminist theory and media studies, which made her the perfect person to bridge between the insidery, jargon-heavy world of gender studies and a popular, easily digested way of thinking through these issues for games practicioners; Polygon's Colin Campbell calls it "a toolkit that developers could use, to lever themselves out of the box they’d made for themselves." This was literally and figuratively "game changing" -- Sarkeesian wields "criticism so sharp that it cut the past from the future," making a new world of games, at real personal cost. That cost is also an important part of the story: Sarkeesian's harassers were unspeakably vile and vicious, and throughout, Sarkeesian made a point of never showing how it affected her, though it did (as it would anyone who was subjected to it). Read the rest
3 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Weber Rapid Fire Chimney Starter on sale
I've been using my Weber Rapid Fire Chimney Starter for about 7 or 8 years. It's the best way to get charcoal barbecues started. No starter fluid needed. Just add the briquettes, put two crumpled sheets of newspaper (I save newsprint junk mail for this) in the bottom, then light the paper. In about 30-40 minutes, the coals are ready. Amazon has it on sale today for . Read the rest
3 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Private Join and Compute is Google's free/open source tool to allow "mulitparty computation" of encrypted data without decryption
Private Join and Compute is a new free/open Google tool that implements the longstanding cryptographic concept of "commutative encryption," which allows untrusted parties to merge their datasets without revealing their contents to one another, do mathematical work on the data, and learn the outcome of that work without either of them seeing the underlying data. Wired's Lily Hay Newman explains how this could work with a hypothetical analysis of the effect of school lunches on health outcomes: the school has a dataset of which student ate which lunch; the health-care provider has a database of the students' health outcomes: using Private Join and Compute, the two datasets can be compared, with calculations such as "sum, count, or average" performed by each party on the other's data, without ever seeing the underlying data in the clear. When that's done, they can both see the results of the computation in the clear. Commutative encryption is a technique that allows data to be encrypted using multiple keys, and decrypted without regard to the order in which the encryption steps were undertaken. Clever use of this technique allows for work to be done among multiple parties' data without ever granting access to the data itself -- sometimes called "homomorphic encryption," which is something of a holy grail for security applications. Though Private Join and Compute makes private calculations possible that were never practical before, it's still computationally intensive, and might not be feasible for use in all situations. And CDT's Hall also points out that it's always possible for the tool to be used to find the answers to questions that society shouldn't know, or that are invasive in some way. Read the rest
4 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Unintentionally funny video instructions for factory resetting GE light bulbs
Use the first reset sequence if: Your bulbs are running on firmware version 2.8 or later (you can find your bulb firmware version by tapping on the device in your C by GE app). We recommend counting with Mississippi (1 Mississippi, 2 Mississippi, 3 Mississippi, etc.). Start with your bulb off for at least 5 seconds. 1. Turn on for 8 seconds 2. Turn off for 2 seconds 3. Turn on for 8 seconds 4. Turn off for 2 seconds 5. Turn on for 8 seconds 6. Turn off for 2 seconds 7. Turn on for 8 seconds 8. Turn off for 2 seconds 9. Turn on for 8 seconds 10. Turn off for 2 seconds 11. Turn on Bulb will flash on and off 3 times if it has been successfully reset. If the factory reset above was unsuccessful, you might have an older version of the C by GE bulb. Please follow the instructions below to reset. Bulb Reset Sequence – for firmware version 2.7 or earlier: We recommend counting with Mississippi (1 Mississippi, 2 Mississippi, 3 Mississippi, etc.). Start with your bulb off for at least 5 seconds. 1. Turn on for 8 seconds 2. Turn off for 2 seconds 3. Turn on for 2 seconds 4. Power off for 2 seconds 5. Turn on for 2 seconds 6. Power off for 2 seconds 7. Turn on for 2 seconds 8. Power off for 2 seconds 9. Turn on for 8 seconds 10. Power off for 2 seconds 11. Read the rest
4 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Stove top pressure cookers are still awesome
The classic pressure cooker was the instant pot before there was an instant pot. Want to turn shoe-leather style brisket into a wonderful pulled-beef sandwich filling in 25 minutes? Get out the pressure cooker. Simply throw food in the pot, make sure you've got a good seal, and let it cook. This pressure cooker easily stores with your pots and pans. It is simple to clean, easy to use and I haven't found anything that makes me wish for an instant pot. A pressure cooker has been a fantastic addition to my car camping kit. T-fal P2614634 Secure Aluminum Initiatives 12-PSI Pressure Cooker Cookware, 6-Quart, Siver via Amazon Read the rest
4 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
New York's MTA allows sex ads for men's products, but not women
New York's Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) seems to be pretty open to sexually related ads, like this one for a mail order Viagra company: View this post on Instagram A post shared by Advertisements in NYC (@advertisements_in_nyc) on Jul 19, 2018 at 3:30pm PDT But the MTA rejected ads for Dame, which makes sex toys for women. From TNW: In September 2018, the MTA approved of Dame’s tasteful and balanced ad campaigns which featured their products, slogans such as, “Toys, for sex,” and testimonials from customers. But by late November, after Dame had reportedly spent $150,000 on the campaign, the MTA had rejected Dame’s ads citing it had updated its own guidelines preventing sexually oriented businesses from advertising. Examples of rejected Dame ads: Dame's response: "So, we’re suing the MTA. NYC’s transit agency perpetuates a harmful double standard. They rejected Dame’s exciting new subway ad campaign, citing vague and sexist reasons. Their message: There’s plenty of space for erectile dysfunction drugs, but none for innovators making sex enjoyable for women. So we’re going to court to #DerailSexism!" Read the rest
4 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Never Trust a Nation
Formed in 2014 by civilian volunteers caught up in the depravity of the Syrian Civil War, the Syrian Civil Defense (SCD), commonly known as The White Helmets, worked to move vulnerable non-combatants from harm's way. They delivered essential services such as first aid and the delivery of humanitarian supplies to areas that foreign NGOs fear to tread. It's thought that since the SCD's inception, they've been responsible for saving well over 100,000 lives, with 204 White Helmet volunteers dying in the process. At most, those working the debris fields of what were once proud Syrian cities on behalf of the SCD were paid $150, per month. Aside from this stipend, it's largely thankless, incredibly dangerous work. For their efforts, the White Helmets came under threat from the Syrian government and their influence-horny Russian allies. With much of the financial and logistical support that had been offered to them by the west drying up as the Syrian Civil War wound down, SCD volunteers were left with few safe places to hide, few resources and seemingly, few allies. Then, something amazing happened. As reported by the BBC, in July of 2018, the Israeli military yoinked 100 White Helmet volunteers and their families--a total of 422 people--out from under the noses of the Syrian military and their allies. The Kingdom of Jordan was cool with giving the White Helmets a place to hang, so long as it was on a short-term basis. Canada offered to grant 10 of the White Helmets and their families asylum. Read the rest
4 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Listen to the cowboy throat singer
While throat singing, aka overtone singing, is a well known practice in the traditional music of Mongolian, Tibetan, and other indigenous people around the world, you can also hear it "Lonely Cowboy," a fantastic 78 RPM shellac record from 1927 by cowboy singer Arthur Miles that also features some lovely yodeling! (via Weird Universe) Read the rest
4 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Are mobile phones actually making young people's skulls develop 'hornlike spikes'?
Protect your 'text neck'
4 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
First we shake, then we bake!
My mom would make Shake 'n Bake, and we loved it. Baking the chicken is reputedly more healthy than frying. Sadly, no Sam the Butcher. Nuggets! Read the rest
4 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
That's Dr. Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck to you!
After eight years, Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck has earned her PhD in higher education from Cardinal Stritch University. And yes, Marijuana Pepsi is her real given name. From the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Her mother, Maggie (Brandy) Johnson, who still lives in Beloit, (Wisconsin) picked out her name and proclaimed that it would take her around the world. Her sisters, one older and one younger, got relatively common names, Kimberly and Robin. Teachers, classmates, bosses and other people in Marijuana's life pushed back against her name and teased her. Some suggested she go to court and change it. Some flat out refused to call her that or insisted on Mary, which she rejected. As much as people blamed and judged her mother for the name, Marijuana credits her mom with making her the strong, balanced, entrepreneurial woman she is today... But mostly she embraces the name as proof that you can overcome any obstacle in life and achieve your dreams... It's fitting that an African American woman who has gone through life as Marijuana Pepsi chose as her dissertation topic: "Black names in white classrooms: Teacher behaviors and student perceptions." "Yes, her name really is Marijuana Pepsi, and now she's Dr. Marijuana Pepsi to you" by Jim Stingl (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) Read the rest
5 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Cracker Barrel holds anti-LGBTQ cop more accountable than Knox County
Grayson Fritts, a Tennessee detective and pastor of what appears to be a very intolerant church, gave an awful sermon asking for the murder of LBGTQ community members. Knox County has offered a string of excuses, while apparently allowing Fritts a payout for retiring early. Cracker Barrel, however, won't let his congregation in. Cracker Barrel had this to say about an upcoming group event planned by Mr. Fritts "All Scripture Baptist Church:" We work hard every day to foster a culture that is welcoming and inclusive. Please see our full statement below. pic.twitter.com/1bpsJ0YmCn — Cracker Barrel (@CrackerBarrel) June 18, 2019 Read the rest
5 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
A treadmill that trips you... for science
As part of research on how to make better prosthetic legs, Vanderbilt University engineers put people on a treadmill and made them stumble. Over and over. By better understanding peoples' stumble reflex, they hope to improve the computer-controlled stumble response in prosthetics. But to learn how people catch themselves, they had to trip them first. And that required building a stumble device into a treadmill. From Vanderbilt University: Andrés Martínez strode briskly on the treadmill, staring straight ahead and counting backwards by seven from 898, a trick to keep his brain from anticipating the literal stumbling block heading his way: a compact 35 pounds of steel specifically designed to make him fall. Special goggles kept him from looking down. Arrows on an eye-level screen kept him from walking off the sides. A harness attached to a ceiling beam kept him safe. Sure enough, when a computer program released the steel block, it glided onto the treadmill, and the Vanderbilt University PhD student struggled to stay on his feet... “Not only did our treadmill device have to trip them, it had to trip them at specific points in their gait,” said Shane King, a PhD student and lead author on the paper. “People stumble differently depending on when their foot hits a barrier. The device also had to overcome their fear of falling, so they couldn’t see or feel when the block was coming.” "A novel system for introducing precisely-controlled, unanticipated gait perturbations for the study of stumble recovery" (Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation) Read the rest
5 h
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Freak out on this fantastic hand illusion
And I thought the people with six fingers on one hand were impressive! Watch below. via Gfycat Read the rest
5 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
VidAngel loses $62MM for pirating and censoring retail movies
VidAngel bought off-the-shelf DVDs, censored them, then offered them for resale. Engadget: A jury has ordered "family-friendly" movie service VidAngel to pay $62.4 million to Hollywood studios for pirating their content. Disney, 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros. sued the company over copyright infringement. VidAngel bought retail DVDs of mainstream movies and ripped the video file. It pulled out adult content, cursing, sex and violent aspects and streamed the films to users. It claimed it was legally allowed to do this under the Family Entertainment And Copyright Act, which legalizes tech to censor certain aspects of movies, but the studios and the jury disagreed. Should the judgment hold up through appeals, that's probably enough to put VidAngel out of business, according to Variety, since it has $2.2 million in hand. When the studios sued the service, VidAngel entered into Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. VidAngel was forced to stop the aforementioned streaming practice a few years ago, though it's still around, running a service that pulls what it thinks are morally questionable parts out of Amazon Prime, HBO and Netflix shows and movies. Read the rest
5 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
The Flintstones meet the Roman Empire, starring Dom DeLuise
This is the title sequence for The Roman Holidays, a Hanna-Barbera Productions cartoon that lasted for 13 episodes in 1972. It was quite similar to The Flintstones which itself was inspired by The Honeymooners. From Toonopedia: The show's title came from the setting (ancient Rome) and the protagonists' family name (Holiday, which was just ever so typical a family name back then). Dad's first name was Gus and Mom's was Laurie. They had a teenage daughter named Groovia, an in-house son-in-law named Happius (usually called Happy) and a younger daughter named Precocia. Their pet cat, Brutus (no relation), was actually a lion. Like modern nuclear family heads, Gus went to work every day, where his boss was Mr. Tycoonus, and came home each night to the Venus de Milo Arms, where his landlord was Mr. Evictus (Dom DeLuise! -ed.). (via r/ObscureMedia) Read the rest
5 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Scammer in silicone mask fooled world's rich into thinking he was French cabinet minister
Ceci n'est pas une ministre. It's a scammer in a silicone mask. "Everything about the story is exceptional," said Delphine Meillet, lawyer to Mr Le Drian, who is now France's foreign minister. "They dared to take on the identity of a serving French minister. Then they called up CEOs and heads of government round the world and asked for vast amounts of money. The nerve of it!" Why Jean-Yves Le Drian was chosen has not been fully explained. A well-respected local politician is elevated to one of the most powerful positions in France, but keeps his head down and gets on with the job instead of making an international media personality of himself. The perfect target for a most audacious identity theft. Read the rest
6 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
The "ghost networks" of mental health professionals that US health insurers rely on to deny care to their patients
If you've decided to investigate treatment options for your mental health, your health insurer will cheerfully refer you to a list of hundreds of providers -- but as STAT's Jack Turban discovered, this "network" of providers is actually a "ghost network," filled with wrong numbers that ring in McDonald's restaurants and jewelers. If you happen to reach an actual mental health professional, they'll probably tell you they're not accepting new patients. An NIH study tried calling 360 in-network Blue Cross Blue Shield providers in Houston, Chicago, and Boston, with a 74% failure rate -- that is, only 26% of those numbers rang in the office of a provider who would make an appointment. For pediatric psychiatrists, the failure rate rises to 83%. Maybe that's just a coincidence...but maybe not. A federal judge found that Unitedhealth was systematically, illegally gaming the system to deny mental health care to its insured customers in order to improve the company's profitability. It's not hard to find a shrink who'll see you -- for $250/hour. But the for-profit health-care industry is signally uninterested in helping Americans take care of their mental health, and since people struggling with mental health issues are often easily discouraged (this is literally a symptom of depression), these hurdles are likely to be terrific money-spinners for the companies and their shareholders. As Turban writes, "Imagine realizing (or acknowledging) that you have depression — a defining feature of which is loss of motivation — and start looking for a psychiatrist. After calling a McDonald’s, a jewelry store, and providers who say they don’t take your insurance but will be happy to see you for $250 per hour that you must pay out of pocket, you’ll likely be inclined to give up." Friedman told me a story about a Massachusetts parent who struggled to find an in-network psychiatrist for her son who was hearing voices. Read the rest
6 h
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Finally, a useful application for augmented reality: rendering virtual kitchen roaches
Laanlabs's showreel for 6d.ai meshing technology is an augmented reality demo in which virtual cockroaches crawl all over a very real kitchen. It's the best use of augmented reality I've ever seen. (via Beyond the Beyond) Read the rest
6 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Telsa's In-Car Gaming System Looks Kinda Meh
If you've been holding off on buying a Telsa Model 3 until you found out whether the car's arcade functionality was worth the electric ride's asking price, wait no more. In this video, The Verge breaks down its experience with the Model 3's in-car gaming system. From what I can see, you can have damn near the same player experience with an iPad and some duct tape in the drivers seat of a 1998 Volkswagen Jetta. Read the rest
7 h
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Arts & Crafts: Build a YETI-style cooler for dirt cheap
YETI's insulated coolers are built like a tank and keep the stuff inside of them cold for eons. They are also prohibitively expensive--it's hard to justify spending hundreds on a piece of gear that many people may only use a few times every year. Happily, YouTuber Steve Wallis figured out how to make a cooler for under $100 that has similar cooling properties. if you've got the time, don't mind getting a bit dirty and would rather spend your cash on steaks than a container to keep said meat chilled, step right up and press play. Read the rest
7 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Apple considering moving hardware production out of China
The escalating tariff slap-fight between the United States of America and the People's Republic of China is messing with so many bottom lines that the only people playing the market and making bank are those with companies that make red ink in their portfolios. Even Apple, a company that pretty much prints its own damn money, isn't immune. In a week where Chinese telecom and computing giant Huawei declared that they'd be making billions less than forecasted, signs that the fruit flavored phone floggers may be looking to shift their operations away from mainland China have cropped up. From the Nikkei Asian Review: Apple has asked its major suppliers to evaluate the cost implications of shifting 15% to 30% of their production capacity from China to Southeast Asia as it prepares for a fundamental restructuring of its supply chain, the Nikkei Asian Review has learned. The California-based tech giant's request was triggered by the protracted trade tensions between Washington and Beijing, but multiple sources say that even if the spat is resolved there will be no turning back. Apple has decided the risks of relying so heavily on manufacturing in China, as it has done for decades, are too great and even rising, several people told Nikkei. The Nikkei Asian Review goes on to talk up the fact that a slowing birthrate, concerns over dependency on centralized production in one locale and rising labor costs are a part of driving Apple's wandering industrial eyes to look on over yonder. Read the rest
7 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
There's now a line of high-end Star Wars furniture
Look closely at that hanging lamp. Big Star Wars fanatic? Then, these are the furniture pieces you are looking for. ELLE Decor: There’s never been a shortage of officially licensed Star Wars furniture on the market; most pieces, however, have been intended for kids’ rooms. But that changed in the fall of 2018, when designer Kenneth Cobonpue launched his own higher-end, higher-design Star Wars furniture collection, initially for sale only in Cobonpue’s native Philippines. Now these pieces are available for the first time in the United States, at select retailers and showrooms in 11 states across the country plus the District of Columbia. (Alas, online ordering is not yet an option.) $2700 TIE Fighter chairs, anyone? See the entire collection, which includes a Chewie rocking stool and a Vader armchair, at the Kenneth Cobonpue site. (ELLE Decor) images via Kenneth Cobonpue Thanks, Heather! Read the rest
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Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Can anti-transgender bias in media be measured?
New data visualization project to reveal bias in media coverage on transgender topics could use your support.
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Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
This renewed Apple iMac is on sale for just $379
This all-in-one computing solution packs a healthy dose of processing power packed inside a 21.5" HD LED display. It also features an Intel Core i3-2100 Dual-Core 3.1GHz CPU with 4 GB of DDR3 RAM for next-level multitasking and an impressive 250 GB SATA hard drive that can safely store your important files and media. So whether you're streaming your favorite content in crisp detail or want to game in stunning clarity, this Certified Refurbished Apple iMac 21.5" Intel i3-2100 Dual-Core 3.1GHz 250GB is just what you need to have your most productive year. Usually, this Apple iMac is $1199, but you can get it here for $379. What Does "Renewed" Mean? Renewed products have gone through extensive testing and have been verified to be completely free of defects by Apple Authorized technicians. Every item has been wiped clean and triple checked internally to give customers the assurance needed when purchasing a new machine. It is also backed by a 1-Year Complete Hardware Warranty. Read the rest
8 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Alien invasion base on the moon, Michael Jackson’s body missing, and Prince Harry’s clash with Trump, in this week’s dubious tabloids
If you’re having a heart attack, forget an EKG in the ER. Instead, have doctors check your legs in the hospital lobby.
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Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things